Warn users when they edit that they are using an obsolete browser
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Description

I have time to time people who are surprised because, suddenly, their interface has changed. Sometimes this is due to their browser, which is not supported anymore.

Warn people who edit pages or use tools that their browser is not supported and may cause a disturbance in their editing experience would help.

Do you have examples of this. The last browser we dropped was IE9 because the number of editors had dropped into small fractions of percents. Also any messages would have to be generated by PHP and appear statically on the page as the targeted users are no longer given JavaScript. This may be more distracting that helpful.

We could show a notice on the edit page, but dismissing such a message would require a page reload, which could lose unsaved edits (no JS).

The most recent example I have is someone who wasn't aware of the fact that its version of Safari is not supported anymore, causing the disparition of the editing toolbar.

Jdforrester-WMF renamed this task from Warn users that they use an obsolete browser to edit to Warn users when they edit that they are using an obsolete browser.Apr 25 2017, 7:10 PM
Jdforrester-WMF triaged this task as Low priority.
Jdforrester-WMF set the point value for this task to 1.
Jdforrester-WMF moved this task from To Triage to Backlog on the VisualEditor board.
Jdforrester-WMF added a subscriber: Jdforrester-WMF.

I vaguely think there's another task for this somewhere, but I might be wrong. In general, many users who are using a very outdated browser are doing so despite, not because, of how much they know about it (e.g. institutional users), or are unable to upgrade for some other reason (e.g. people with very old machines that can't take newer operating systems). This might be too much of a taunt to them, especially if we showed it on every edit?

I vaguely think there's another task for this somewhere, but I might be wrong.

I actually have the same feeling.

In general, many users who are using a very outdated browser are doing so despite, not because, of how much they know about it (e.g. institutional users), or are unable to upgrade for some other reason (e.g. people with very old machines that can't take newer operating systems).

I see the point. I cant quantify how many people are in this case, but, for individuals, it is certainly less than what can happen on institutions. This is a good motive to decline the task.

This might be too much of a taunt to them, especially if we showed it on every edit?

Not on every edit, for the first is enough.