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Create generic "Android" tag for tagging issues somehow related to the Android mobile OS
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Description

Since for whatever reason these sorta things need to be discussed...I propose the creation of a simple, generic, catch-all "Android" tag for issues related to the Android mobile operating system (with the exception of the official Wikipedia app for Android since that has a dedicated developer team and separate components already in Phab, which enables the devs to efficiently manage tasks related to that app).

Right now there are tags like Browser-Support-Android-Google-Chrome which are rather narrow in scope, and on the other hand there is Mobile which is way broader in scope. An "Android" tag would enable interested users to easily find -- and hopefully test and fix! -- issues which are present on Android (but not e.g. on iOS or on desktop, etc.).

Event Timeline

ashley created this task.Nov 24 2017, 2:58 PM
Restricted Application added a subscriber: Aklapper. · View Herald TranscriptNov 24 2017, 2:58 PM

Is there one for generic iOS, too? Both would be good.

Is there one for generic iOS, too? Both would be good.

Not that I can see -- the few projects prefixed with "iOS" pertain to the official Wikipedia app for iOS devices as opposed to bugs/tasks/etc. which have to do with the Apple iOS operating system but not with the Wikipedia app; therefore I agree, an iOS tag would also be very much appropriate (since together Android and iOS basically dominate the mobile world; Windows Phone is basically dead for all intents and purposes and the other older/legacy operating systems have even fewer users, akin to someone using Windows 9x on desktop to browse the Internet).

Harej added a subscriber: Harej.EditedDec 12 2017, 10:15 AM

What are issues that would affect the Android operating system as a whole, regardless of which browser you use? Or, what are issues that would affect the non-browser parts of Android? (If an issue affects a certain browser on Android, it would be correct to tag it for that particular browser.) Does Android expose an API that lets websites interact with the core operating system, and does MediaWiki use this API?

Same questions for iOS.

What are issues that would affect the Android operating system as a whole, regardless of which browser you use? Or, what are issues that would affect the non-browser parts of Android?

Given Android's fragmentation I'd imagine such bugs popping up is just inevitable. Even the term "Android" isn't as clear-cut as "iOS" -- with iOS, we all know that we're talking roughly about the same thing (a mobile operating system developed by Apple for use in their iDevices, such as the iPhone), but with Android...some people mean by Android "Google's mobile OS" (as in having Google Play Services and other proprietary nonsense, which, in such people's opinion, means that devices like Nokia X are not Android devices), some people mean by Android "the Android Open Source Project (AOSP)" and in this context by Android I mean "anything even remotely based on AOSP" -- meaning devices ranging from the Nokia X to Samsung Galaxy S8 and everything inbetween and beyond.

If an issue affects a certain browser on Android, it would be correct to tag it for that particular browser.

Technically speaking yes, but this approach has a few issues:

  1. Right now the only tag (that I'm aware of) for "browsers on the Android platform" (as I defined "Android" earlier on) is Browser-Support-Android-Google-Chrome, but there are plenty of non-Google Chrome browsers for Android. I personally use Firefox for Android (codenamed Fennec), but there are various other -- some FOSS, some not -- browsers out there; to name a few: Qualcomm's Chromium Browser for their Snapdragon SoCs, various aftermarket ROM-specific browsers (CyanogenMod/Lineage OS browser), and of course all the ones notable enough to have an English Wikipedia page about them.
  2. But creating tags for all these browsers (and more) would likely add some unwanted noise, and given the lifecycle of an average Android app, I fear we'd end up with a bunch of Browser-Support-Android-<some discontinued browser> tags.

Does Android expose an API that lets websites interact with the core operating system, and does MediaWiki use this API?

While maybe not exactly what you meant, WebView popped into my mind. WebView allows Android application developers, to quote the linked doc page, "can roll your own web browser or simply display some online content within your Activity" and it's included as a core component in many modern Android versions. WebView is based on the WebKit rendering engine, and as such, if we have an Android application that allows to browse web pages, it's entirely possible that there are layout quirks or bugs which would thus be not specific to a certain browser on Android nor to the WebKit engine in general, but rather the WebView component on Android; hence an Android OS level issue (which we might be able to work around by tweaking our CSS/JS/whatnot).

Same questions for iOS.

As I noted earlier, due to its proprietary nature, iOS is far less fragmented than Android, and given that Apple does not allow third-party browsers to use a custom rendering engine but rather forces them to use iOS' built-in frameworks, which means that bugs are even more likely to be OS-specific than on Android as opposed to being browser-specific.

What are issues that would affect the Android operating system as a whole, regardless of which browser you use? Or, what are issues that would affect the non-browser parts of Android?

Given Android's fragmentation I'd imagine such bugs popping up is just inevitable. Even the term "Android" isn't as clear-cut as "iOS" -- with iOS, we all know that we're talking roughly about the same thing (a mobile operating system developed by Apple for use in their iDevices, such as the iPhone), but with Android...some people mean by Android "Google's mobile OS" (as in having Google Play Services and other proprietary nonsense, which, in such people's opinion, means that devices like Nokia X are not Android devices), some people mean by Android "the Android Open Source Project (AOSP)" and in this context by Android I mean "anything even remotely based on AOSP" -- meaning devices ranging from the Nokia X to Samsung Galaxy S8 and everything inbetween and beyond.

I don't understand. Surely that means there's less value in having a generic "Android" tag, as it tells you less about what's actually the issue?

If an issue affects a certain browser on Android, it would be correct to tag it for that particular browser.

Technically speaking yes, but this approach has a few issues:

  1. Right now the only tag (that I'm aware of) for "browsers on the Android platform" (as I defined "Android" earlier on) is Browser-Support-Android-Google-Chrome, but there are plenty of non-Google Chrome browsers for Android. I personally use Firefox for Android (codenamed Fennec), but there are various other -- some FOSS, some not -- browsers out there; to name a few: Qualcomm's Chromium Browser for their Snapdragon SoCs, various aftermarket ROM-specific browsers (CyanogenMod/Lineage OS browser), and of course all the ones notable enough to have an English Wikipedia page about them.
  2. But creating tags for all these browsers (and more) would likely add some unwanted noise, and given the lifecycle of an average Android app, I fear we'd end up with a bunch of Browser-Support-Android-<some discontinued browser> tags.

That would be a feature, not a bug. Once we determined that we didn't care about some browser, we could trivially find and Decline all tasks under that tag.

@ashley: Could you point out one or two specific tasks here in Wikimedia Phabricator on which you would add this tag and consider it useful?
That would probably help understand better and make discussion less abstract. Thanks :)