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Give a Confirmed right to new Wikidata users who are active and trusted on other projects
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Description

Hi,

I am helping the people who are writing in the recently created N'Ko Wikipedia to learn the technical sides of contributing to Wikimedia projects. One of the repeating issues that we ran into is that they cannot add sitelinks to Wikidata for some articles: the first articles that they created are, quite naturally, basic famous items about things like countries, planets, philosophy, etc. Some of the items about these popular articles are protected. These users have hundreds of contributions in their language and in the Incubator, but not on Wikidata, so they couldn't add a sitelink.

I asked to give them the Confirmed right on https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Wikidata:Requests_for_permissions/Other_rights , and the right was given. It would be even better, however, if it was given automatically and the step for requesting this manually wasn't needed. A user who has more than a hundred edits on another wiki is probably trusted enough to add sitelinks. Given Wikidata's special nature as a central data repository, there should be mutual trust between projects.

Obviously, this applies not only to the N'Ko language, but to all languages.

I'm not sure that this can be done in core MediaWiki itself. If not, perhaps there could be some kind of a bot that grants these rights to users, so that they could start contributing transparently, without having to request the rights.

Event Timeline

Amire80 created this task.Thu, Oct 10, 8:31 AM
Restricted Application added a subscriber: Aklapper. · View Herald TranscriptThu, Oct 10, 8:31 AM
DannyS712 added a subscriber: DannyS712.
Lydia_Pintscher added a subscriber: Lydia_Pintscher.

Sounds like a good idea to me. In the end it's up to the editors of course. It seems to me like something to be done with a bot.

abian added a subscriber: abian.EditedThu, Oct 10, 3:08 PM

Usually editors have two opposite views about this option. One is similar to what @Amire80 exposes: if we propagate the autoconfirmed statuses from Wikipedias to Wikidata, then these autoconfirmed users are free to work on their wikis autonomously, without having to care about Wikidata. The other view is that they should actually care about Wikidata, that the confirmed status is easy to get and that you already get it automatically after carrying out the few test edits necessary to know what Wikidata is about. Some people will say the first option pursues our goals and contributes more to centralization/harmonization, and others will say exactly the same about the second option.

My opinion: both options hide a part of reality and none of them completely solves the problem of wanting to contribute and not having permissions to do so, which is the important point. Many users who create articles are newcomers, and for them propagating the autoconfirmed status is useless. I would rather opt for quick and intuitive mechanisms that allow users without permission to request a change or provide feedback in general (T234976) in cases where they can't contribute on their own, whatever those cases or their reasons are.

For this specific example I would say the use case of having a new Wikipedia and needing to link the most important articles to Wikidata is quite sporadic and it's not a problem to assign some flags manually. But it would also be great to encourage editors to complete labels and descriptions in N'Ko, and thanks to that get the autoconfirmed status to continue editing absolutely anything they want on Wikidata, forever. :-)

I didn't say that they don't have to care about Wikidata and only work autonomously on Wikipedia. Some of the people I talk about do care about Wikidata, but that's not the point.

It's legitimate to think that they should care about Wikidata, but it has nothing to do with the convoluted process of asking for permissions. You say that it's not a problem to ask for it manually, but it is. If the permissions will be granted in any case, they should just be given by software, without having to ask for them on obscure talk pages and wait for a response.

abian added a comment.EditedSun, Oct 13, 12:34 PM

The status is automatically given by the software after carrying out some edits. By "care about Wikidata" people usually mean learning what Wikidata is about by carrying out those edits. In that case (the usual), the flag request is unnecessary.
(By the way, we can consider lowering the threshold of the number of edits if we conclude that it's too high, although it was actually increased a few years ago for the opposite reason; I was not involved in the process and, honestly, I don't remember what that threshold is right now.)

Yes, but fifty bis quite a lot. For some people it will be easy to make fifty Wikidata edits, but not for everyone.